Best summertime adventures in the Pacific Northwest

By Eric Wright

With summer in full swing and Mother Nature in all its glory, its time to get a little dirt on those boots and make some lifelong memories adventuring in the great outdoors. From soaring mountains and pristine lakes to majestic wildlife and adrenaline-pumping recreational activities, the Pacific Northwest has it all. Check out these six unforgettable experiences, and have yourself an exhilarating vacation in this majestic part of the world.

1. Run and hike the majestic Mt. Rainier

Rising into the heavens at an incredible 14,411 feet, Mount Rainier is the largest glacial system and the tallest peak in the lower 48 states, offering a rich diversity of wildlife; fields upon fields of beautiful wildflowers; and, of course, jaw-dropping vistas.

Fitness fanatics can get their blood pumping by heading out on a run on part of the 93-mile Wonderland Trail, which winds its way around the snow-capped volcano. The fabled Skyline Trail is also a favorite among visitors, as the 1,400-foot elevation gain showcases sublime views of the Tatoosh Range and the Cascades.

Relax after a thrilling day of exploration at your own little slice of heaven: this tiny house that's just over an hour from Mount Rainier National Park!

2. Whale watching from the San Juan Islands

Set sail on a once-in-a-lifetime quest to spot fascinating creatures, such as magnificent orca whales, playful seals, and regal eagles, by taking a day boat trip from Vancouver around the gorgeous San Juan and Orcas Islands.

With whale-spotting success rates of up to 90%, these tours last from three to five hours, going into the Strait of Georgia and around the Gulf Islands, and allow intrepid travelers the chance to get a real insight into the native marine wildlife from the hand of experienced guides.

Stay on nearby Mayne Island, and soak up even more nature from right outside the front door at this dreamy cottage.

3. Whitewater rafting near Mt. Hood National Forest

Surrounded by 11 glistening glaciers, the year-round snowy peak of Mount Hood in Oregon is a hiker's paradise. The pristine rivers flowing down from the rugged peaks, however, offer a unique way for visitors to take in the lush Pacific Northwest wilderness.

Companies, like Wet Planet Whitewater, offer spectacular day excursions on the rapids during summer—both on the Columbia River Gorge and the West Fork and Main sections of the Hood River.

Take a different kind of dip by hopping into your own wood-fired bathtub secluded in nature at this
romantic retreat near Mount Hood!

4. Take a cruise from Seattle

For those wanting to get out on the water, one of the best options in the PNW is to set sail from the Emerald City, and enjoy the serene views of the stunning 542-acre Discovery Park—all before venturing into the Olympic Mountains for some epic hiking trials with spectacular scenery.

Since Washington's Olympic National Park overlooks the Pacific Ocean, there are endless sandy beaches, magical rainforests, and native wildlife to be discovered. At the end of an active day outdoors, what could be better than heading back to your own secluded getaway near the Hoh Rainforest?

You may never want to leave this incredible tiny house in the Olympic National Park.

5. Go zip-lining on Vancouver Island

Vancouver Island boasts a raw, ocean-carved landscape that is surrounded by snowcapped mountains, zig-zagging coastline, and rich wilderness—the ideal spot to have the adventure of a lifetime. Apart from unforgettable experiences, such as whale spotting, this pristine area of British Columbia is also ideal for some truly electrifying aerial pursuits. Why not head over to Adrena Line, on the south side of the island, for a rip-roaring day of zip-lines up to 1,000 feet high?

Take a much neeed rest at your own private suite—complete with Jacuzzi tub—near Victoria.

6. Hike and kayak the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest

Sprawling millions of acres across Washington, the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest is a prime location for those looking to immerse themselves in ancient forests and vibrant wilderness. With great hiking, running, and mountain biking trails, those looking for adventure have found their ideal playground. There are also fantastic opportunities for fishing, horseback riding, and climbing in the park, while taking a kayak out on Lake Wenatchee is a serene experience, surrounded by awesome peaks, and one not to be missed.

Get ready to fire up the grill and enjoy some tasty homemade burgers after a full day of activities with a stay at this log cabin in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest.

Want to keep exploring the PNW? Check out our favorite unique weekend trips in the Pacific Northwest to get some inspiration for yours!

Costa Vicentina: A hidden surfers' paradise in Portugal

By Fred Jéquier

Photo from cEkonomista.

Every year, surfers across Europe flock to some of the most popular surf spots in the continent. Usual suspects include Biarritz in France; San Sebastian in northern Spain, Sennen Cove in Cornwall, England, and Peniche in Portugal. If you're looking for somewhere new to ride some waves this summer, look no further. The stunning Costa Vicentina is where you should be looking. This incredible coastline—rich in history, culture, and, of course, waves—has numerous beaches that are perfect for a summer surfing adventure.

Where is Costa Vicentina?

Costa Vicentina is set in the incredible Alentejo and Algarve regions of Portugal. Part of a natural park that starts further north and runs from the fishing village of Burgau in the south to Odeceixe Beach, Costa Vicentina is the longest stretch of protected Portuguese coast, with beaches as far as the eye can see.

This area of preserved nature has breathtaking, rugged character that is different to other parts of southwestern and southern Portugal. Heading west from Lagos, you'll leave the picturesque caves and coves behind you and will soon find yourself amid vast, empty swathes of sand or tiny, inaccessible beaches—perfect for the more adventurous surfer, as they are continually hammered by the full force of the Atlantic Ocean.

History of the region

Costa Vicentina has a rich history that precedes its current role as a surfers' paradise. Cape St. Vincent, the most south-western point in Europe, has religious traditions that stretch as far back as the Ancient Greeks, who called it the Land of the Serpents, and the Romans, who considered the horizon beyond which the sun set sacred, referred to it as Promontorium Sacrum, which means Holy Promontory, and is the Latin origin of the coastal town of Sagres.

The Romans saw the cape as the end of the world, where the sun would be submerged each day into the endless ocean—a belief that some still clung to during the medieval period. Skip forward to the 15th century, and Costa Vicentina became an increasingly important area during the European age of discovery.

Photo from Lisbon Tourism.

Prince Henry the Navigator (1394-1460), the fourth child of King John I of Portugal, and the Governor of the Algarve, dedicated his life to furthering Portugal's early voyages of discovery and founded the School of Navigation in Sagres. He also oversaw the creation of caravels—ships that were faster and lighter than their predecessors, as well as highly maneuverable, which was perfect for exploring the African coast line and going into the Atlantic.

The Fortaleza, or fortress on the headland above Sagres, located on a dramatic, narrow headland that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean, may well have been where Henry's School of Navigation was based, he certainly spent a good amount of time there planning his voyages. Nowadays, it's a must-see for tourists. This windswept spot overlooks the ocean, with incredible coastal views.

Top surfing spots

The Costa Vicentina has a plethora of beaches for you to choose from, each different to the last. Whether you're a beginner, or an advanced surfer used to charging waves as tall as houses, you are bound to find a beach that suits your needs when you head to this unique coastline. Here are just a few of our favorites!

1. Arrifana Beach

Half way between Praia de Odeceixe and Sagres, this crescent-shaped beach is perfect for surfers of any level. Beginners can make the most of the slightly slower waves at high tide, and those with more experience can head out at low tide for the faster waves. On days with a good swell, the beach can have a lot of visitors, but this is a great spot for both surfing, and relaxing. The town has a variety of restaurants and bars for when you've built up an appetite carving the waves.

2. Amado Beach

A 25-minute drive from Sagres, the waves that roll into Amado Beach are not reliant on the tides, making it the perfect spot for surfers all year round. One of the most consistent surfing spots in the area, it is open to all Atlantic swells, and as a protected area, it's not built-up, allowing you to enjoy a secluded, peaceful beach. If you're planning on visiting this stunning bit of coastline, you'll be able to find a place to stay in Sagres, or even Lagos, which is just 40 minutes away.

3. Castelejo Beach

Just 12 kilometers from Sagres, Castelejo Beach can be affected by westerly winds, meaning that in the summer months, the waves are conducive to anyone who wants to learn how to surf from scratch. Meanwhile, in autumn, the beach can come into contact with some fairly strong Atlantic swells that create world-class waves—perfect if you're a seasoned surfer.

4. Beliche Beach

Even closer to Sagres than Castelejo Beach⁠—a 10-minute drive in fact⁠—Beliche Beach is surrounded by large cliffs, creating a stunning spot to get in some surfing. The waves are at their best here either side of the main summer months, and they are perfect for intermediate to advanced surfers to enjoy.

5. Zavial Beach

Just east of Sagres, Zavial Beach is one of the first major surfing beaches when you enter the Costa Vicentina—and one of the best-known. With fast waves that are enhanced by strong winds, it gets good swells that are great for beginner and intermediate surfers. On days when there is a lull and the waves are not at their best, the beach itself is a stunning spot to relax or swim.

Surf schools

If you've never been surfing before, but fancy having a go at it while visiting the Costa Vicentina, we've got some suggestions of surfing schools that'll help you on your way to becoming the next Kelly Slater.

1. Boa Onda Surf School

The Boa Onda Surf School has a great reputation. Set just a 10-minute drive from the town of Aljezur, Boa Onda Surf School has classes throughout the year, with prices ranging from 35€ for half a day or a five-day course that costs 225€ in high season. They also have options for a residential course, and you can rent all the necessary equipment from the school, so you don't need to invest in a pricey new board and wetsuit.

2. Odeceixe Surf School

Founded in 2008, the Odeceixe Surf School is set close to the beach and has a small team of experienced instructors. For a day's class in high season, it'll set you back 60€, and up to five days will cost 250€. Typically, one class will get you between three and four hours in the water with an instructor.

The price doesn't just cover your lesson, though. You will get the use of a board and wetsuit, transport to beaches only locals know about, and even sports insurance—along with a comprehensive guide in dangers, such as rips, currents, and how to safely paddle in and out of the surf.

3. Mission To Surf

With more than 20 years experience, Mission To Surf will make the impossible possible. Set in Palmeirinha, and with surf classes for beginners to advanced surfers, Mission To Surf has something for everyone. A beginner course will place you in a class of no more than eight students, so you can be sure of maximum supervision from your instructor. A week-long course costs 250€ in high season and 200€ in the low season, with classes typically lasting four hours. You can also opt for one-on-one classes for an hour, which 55€ for the first hour, with the option of a second hour for an additional 28€.


Keep exploring the incredible beauty of Portugal with a stay at one of our amazing accommodations!

Extreme adventure travel: The Haute Route

By Fred Jéquier

Photo from Wilderness Travel.

When we think of the Alps, we normally think of skiing, snowboarding, and snow-covered mountains, but winter is not the only time to enjoy this stunning mountain range. Once the ski season has wound down for the year, it's time to get out the mountain bikes and boards or pull on your hiking boots.

The Haute Route is the perfect way to explore great swathes of the Alps. It gives any intrepid explorer the chance to combine both hiking and mountaineering without having to emulate career climbers and free soloists, like Alex Honnold, or ultra athletes, like Anton Krupicka—all while giving visitors to the region a comprehensive tour of this incredible mountain range.

Photo from Alex Honnold.

What is the Haute Route?

The Haute Route is a trekking expedition through the French and Swiss Alps that was first traversed in 1861 by climbers making their way to climb the Matterhorn. Over the years, the route has been perfected, and it is now a network of well-marked and signposted trails that lead travelers through valleys and mountain paths to mountain huts, small inns, and hotels in the idyllic villages and towns dotted along the way.

The expedition is a safe way to enjoy a mountaineering trip that doesn't require ropes, crampons, or specialized devices, but still remains challenging, due to the daily elevations and distances—all of which are achievable for anyone with a decent fitness level.

Photo from Nanuk Experience .

Starting in Chamonix, France, the route takes hikers over the swiss border, ending in Zermatt, just under a fortnight later. Taking part in this trip will not only give you the chance to explore some beautiful Alpine towns, but you will also get the chance to see Mont Blanc and the Matterhorn in all their glory.

The hike will take you from altitudes of 1,800 meters to almost 3,000 meters over the course of the expedition. You'll get to enjoy a front row seat to Mont Blanc and the Matterhorn; explore valleys, lakes, and glaciers; try some great local food; and learn about the region's history and culture.

Photo from Pinterest .

Who to go with

With a trip of this caliber, you're going to want to go with a guide who knows the route like the back of their hand and has a wide range of experience leading expeditions. There are various tour companies that offer great experiences and differing packages, depending on the wants and desires of the adventurer signing up to get involved in some Alpine trailblazing.

1. Wilderness Adventure

Wilderness Travel is one such company, with numerous veteran guides when it comes to leading an expedition. In addition to their Alpine adventure, Wilderness Travel has packages available all over the world, catering to all adventuring tastes and abilities.

Their Haute Route package, starting at $5,995, covers accommodation and all but two meals over a 12-day period. If this hike isn't challenging enough, the more intrepid explorer can also opt for their bespoke, Great Alpine Traverse, that will take you from Chamonix in France, through Switzerland, northern Italy, southern Germany, and finally to the historic city of Salzburg, Austria.

2. Alpenwild

Alpenwild specializes in trips and treks through the Alps. They also have a variety of packages available to their clients, each one offering differing difficulty levels and the option of either guided or self-guided treks.

The full, guided option will get you an all-inclusive experience. For $4,595, you'll get picked up at Geneva Airport, transported to Chamonix, and you'll have a guide leading the group for the full 11-day trip, followed by transportation from Zermatt to Geneva on the final day. All accommodations and meals, minus drinks and gratuities, are also included.

The self-guided option, starting from $2,895, also provides transportation to and from Geneva Airport, along with 13 nights in hostels, huts, and inns. Buffet breakfasts in each of the accommodations are available. Nine evening meals are also included, but you'll need to find a spot to eat in Chamonix, Verbier, and Zermatt, which will be easy enough. All three towns have a wide variety of restaurants and bars to choose from, so your only dilemma will be choosing between them all.

Alpenwild also provide you with all the information, maps, and documents you will need to complete the trip, including detailed route directions, basic trail maps, hotel contact information, train and bus schedules, and nearby emergency medical contacts.

What to bring

It goes with out saying, a trip like this requires a specific packing list. While you can leave your climbing ropes and crampons at home for this one, there are certain things that you should remember to put into your rucksack before catching your flight to Geneva. Here are just a few suggestions for your Haute Route adventure!

1. Hiking boots

It may seem like an obvious one, but there's never any harm in a small reminder. You're going to be hiking over some tough, albeit stunning, terrain, so a sturdy boot is vital. The better boots on the market offer support for your foot while also ensuring you don't roll your ankle if you step on loose rocks and turf. If you're buying new boots specifically for your trip, make sure you wear them in first to avoid blisters and discomfort on your trek.

Photo from Blacks.

2. Foot care products

When you reach your accommodation each night, the first thing you're going to want to do is unwind with a hot shower or a relaxing bath. Once you've washed away the day, make sure your feet are looked after well. Using moisturizing creams will help, but it doesn't stop there. Before you get going in the morning, make sure to use the same creams; mycota powder, which contains zinc undecylenoate and undecylenoic acid; and anti-rubbing tape in the areas you are susceptible to getting blisters in—all of which will ensure your feet don't go through undue trauma along the way.

Photo from Andrew Skurka.

3. A lightweight jacket

Yes, you are going in the summer, but it's still a mountain range! There's no denying there will be days when you're more comfortable with just a fleece or even a t-shirt, but when you're up to nearly 3,000 meters, staring the mountains in the face, you'll be grateful you packed a quality, lightweight jacket.

The Patagonia Nano Puff Jacket is a good option—light, yet warm, and water-resistant, it is easy to pack, and you'll definitely use it after your trip. Made from a 100% recycled polyester ripstop shell and lining fabric, the jacket zips to the neck, ensuring full body coverage. Although on the more expensive end of the spectrum, this will last you for years, making it a worthwhile investment.

Photo from Patagonia.

How to prepare

You've booked your trip, and you've bought your equipment, but you can't rest on your laurels now! While the Haute Route is doable for both rookies and mountaineering veterans, you'll still need to prepare your legs for what's about to come.

Photo from Pinterest .

1. Running

Going running several times a week is great preparation. You're not just strengthening your legs; you're also improving your cardio and lung function. You're not preparing for a marathon, so a five-kilometer run in the park two to three times a week should be enough.

2. Head to the gym

Going to the gym can be a bit of a drag, but some upper body work will help strengthen you up for carrying a backpack up mountain paths for a couple of weeks. While you're there, why not spend some time on a stair stepper, too? After all, a large portion of each day is going to be spent going up hill, so a few sessions will strengthen your joints before your adventure.

3. Hike before you hike

In the same way that the best way to prepare for a marathon is to run, the best way to prepare for a hiking holiday is to go hiking. You can pick some spots close to home, and once a week or so, head out and stomp up hills, through forests, and along footpaths for a few hours.

Again, as with running, you don't need to head out on a hobbit-sized quest, but getting your feet used to the idea of extended walking will only make it easier when you're halfway up a mountain path. It's also a great opportunity to break in those new hiking boots, as well!


Caught the hiking bug? Check out this blog for incredible places to hike and suggestions of places to stay on your next extraordinary adventure!

Extreme adventure travel: Via Ferrata in Cumbria, England

By Arran Wallace

What better way to disconnect from your daily routine, embrace the great outdoors, and get some quality time with friends or family than by trying a new and exciting activity together? You have a plethora of options for your next unique experience, but our top suggestion for this summer will take you to the U.K.

For the ideal extreme adventure travel plan for this summer, check out the Via Ferrata in Cumbria, England.

Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

What is a via ferrata?

Via ferrata means iron path in Italian and is a climbing route that consists of a steel cable and iron steps and ladders, all of which are fixed to rock. Some via ferratas go the extra mile and include suspension bridges and zip-lines for those seeking an extra adrenaline rush.

Climbers attach themselves to the rock by clipping their harness to the steel cable and use the steps and ladders to progress. It's like a mix of traditional rock-climbing and scrambling, and it makes certain altitudes and peaks more accessible to the non-expert climber. All you need is sensible footwear and a good head for heights; most places provide or rent out all of the necessary equipment.

The need-to-know about Cumbria's Via Ferrata

Photo courtesy of Honister Slate Mine.

This particular via ferrata is located in the last working slate mine in England—Honister Slate Mine—where mining was carried out from 1728 until 1989. The mine was closed for a few years, but it was later reopened in 1997, with the addition of a tourist attraction within the Lake District National Park that includes underground tours and a visitors center.

Soon afterwards, the Via Ferrata (England's first!) was installed and proved to be extremely popular—even winning the "Best Tourism Experience in the Lake District" in 2011! It follows the original track that the miners used up the steep incline of Fleetwith Pike, reaching a height of 2,126 feet.

What to expect

Cumbria's Via Ferrata works like every other. Although trained guides accompany you and help to fasten you securely to the steel cable, it's all up to you to navigate the cliff-facing ladders, bridges, and narrow edges. It can be a mentally challenging, yet ultimately rewarding, activity, and whenever the going gets tough, just remember, miners used to do this without safety equipment!

There are two routes available to budding climbers: the Via Ferrata Classic and the Via Ferrata Xtreme. Both take around three hours, but the Xtreme follows a slightly different route—throwing in more edge exposure, vertical climbs, cliff-edge ladders, and a Burma bridge and cargo net to cross.

What to remember

Photo courtesy of Honister Slate Mine.
  • At Honister Slate Mine, all the necessary equipment is provided, including harnesses and helmets, but you are expected to dress appropriately and wear sensible footwear, so no heels or sandals!
  • Wear your helmet at all times, even during the designated breaks. While extremely unlikely, there may be the odd falling rock from above.
  • Your guide is there for a reason! Listen to the safety information before you start off, and if you get stuck, you can ask them the best way to maneuver across the rocks.
  • Check weather conditions before booking! You don't want to be holding onto iron rungs when lightning comes.
  • Take only essential items, such as water, high-energy snacks, gloves, and sunglasses. Mobile phones tend not to survive falls of hundreds of feet!
  • While the cable is there to be used, try not to use it for excessive load-pulling; use the iron rungs and rock face to push and pull yourself up.
  • Have fun, and don't look down!

What to enjoy in Cumbria afterward

Photo courtesy of the Lake District National Park Facebook page.

Once you're back on ground level and have got your sea legs back, you're going to want to check out what else there is on offer in the area. For those who love being in nature, Cumbria is a haven for outdoor activities, and much of the region is covered by the Lake District National Park.

In this national park, you'll find a rolling landscape of hills, valleys, and lakes, from which the park gets its name. Scafell Pike—England's largest peak at 3,209 feet—is just 10 kilometers south of Honister Mine; however, those wishing to conquer its peak will have to drive up, around, and back down south to attempt the summit on its western side.

Photo courtesy of The Crazy Tourist.

The quaint and charming towns of Keswick and Ambleside are both within easy driving distance of the mine, offering visitors the chance to experience typical architecture of the region and a surprising amount of traditional pubs, given their size.

Cumbria is also known for its various breweries and distilleries, and the famous Lakes Distillery is known for its whisky called, "The ONE" whisky, which was the first blended whisky in the British Isles. They now create their own gins and vodkas, too—the only ones brewed in Cumbria—and have been named one of the "Eight Distilleries to Visit Before You Die" by World Whisky Day.

For those who prefer something a little lighter, Hawkshead Brewery is an innovative craft brewery that offers interesting taps, such as marshmallow and chocolate imperial stouts. They host brewery tours and beer festivals throughout the year, too! The brewery is located near the town of Kendal, the birthplace of Kendal Mint Cake, which is a peppermint confection popular among British climbers as a quick source of energy. Check to see if your Via Ferrata guide has any spare ones in his or her pockets!


Gearing up for a holiday? Check out all of our offerings in England for more unique adventures!

Where to go canyoning in Croatia

By Fred Jéquier

Over the last few years, Croatia has been growing in popularity as a destination for travelers looking to enjoy beautiful beaches, swim in the sapphire blue waters of the Adriatic Sea, and lose themselves in the cobbled streets of historic towns and cities.

Photo from Adriatic Explore.

There's no denying that Game of Thrones' own capital city finding its home in Dubrovnik has helped the rise in tourism to the area in the last eight years or so. As we bid farewell to the Red Keep of Kings Landing this May, however, travelers and adventure-seekers can start to look further inland of this beautiful and rugged country.

Photo from CityPal.

Croatia's beaches, cities, and towns are undeniably stunning—and, without a shadow of a doubt, an important part of any holiday-goer's itinerary. This beautiful Balkan nation has so much to offer off the beaten path, away from the sand and surf, though!

If a trip to simply explore the landscapes of Croatia is what you seek, there are numerous wonderful lakes and trails to explore with guided hiking trips, and they won't disappoint. Areas such as Plitvice Lake are beyond stunning, and there are companies that lead hiking holidays that incorporate the best routes and trails that Croatia has to offer. For those looking to push themselves and experience something completely different, though, we have the perfect plan for you.

Photo from Visit Croatia.

Keep reading to find out about where to go, who to ask, and what to bring when you go canyoning in Croatia!

What is canyoning?

When you head out on a canyoning expedition, you can expect a day of navigating a river by hiking, swimming, abseiling, or rappelling, as well as cliff jumping, negotiating river rapids and waterfalls, climbing over boulders and rocks, and even whizzing along natural waterslides. Canyoning can often include an element of orienteering, in addition to other outdoor skills, especially in more remote areas.

Photo from Split Adventure.

Where to go

The Cetina River is without a doubt the hub of canyoning in Croatia. The most water-rich river in the Dalmatia region of Croatia, the river is located in the south of the country. About 100 kilometers long, it winds its way through gorges and lakes until it reaches the town of Omiš on the Adriatic coast.

Photo from Omnivia.

Surrounded by cliffs and forest, River Cetina offers canyoners, both novice and expert, a taste of every aspect of the activity. From rappelling and abseiling cliffs of up to 50 meters to leaping into deep pools, you are guaranteed a full day of adrenaline-pumping fun and excitement.

The starting point for the best routes and the finish line are both just under an hour from the charming town of Split, which is perched on the Dalmatian coast. If you stay near to or in Split, you can enjoy a unique weekend of canyoning, followed by a cultural day exploring the town and Diocletian's Roman palace.

Who to ask

When planning your canyoning adventure, you want to be in the best hands and find a guide who not only knows the area well, but who is also trained in all the safety aspects of the activity.

1. Canyoning Croatia

Canyoning Croatia offers two different tours to their clients from April until October. If you're a beginner to the activity, you can opt for the Basic Tour, priced at 46 euros per person, and anyone who feels they have the experience or ability can go for the Extreme Tour, which will cost 60 euros.

If you are staying in Split or Zadvarje, you can arrange to be picked up and driven to the starting point, and then dropped back at the end of the day. Canyoning Croatia supply wetsuits, helmets, and all other necessary equipment, so all you need is your swimsuit, sturdy trainers, and your sense of adventure!

2. Split Adventure

Split Adventure offer day tours through the canyon, and their expert guides will take you along 2.5 kilometers of river trails of varying difficulty, depending on your level and experience. This is a really affordable and incredible day out, with a price of 60 euros total for the tour, equipment, insurance, and guide. It's also just 15 euros for the return transfer from Split. Adventurers only need to remember to bring trainers, swimsuits, and a change of clothes, but Split Adventure also has the Five Ten Canyoneer 3 shoes to rent, although there are only a limited amount.

3. Adventure Omiš

At the other end of the river is Adventure Omiš Also offering both basic and advanced canyoning for 47 euros and 67 euros respectively, the price includes insurance, professional canyoning guides, wetsuits, lifejackets, helmets, and safety belts. It even includes the transfer from Omiš to the village of Zadvarje, where your canyoning adventure starts, and your transfer back to Omiš. What's more? Adventure Omiš also offers other great activities, including rock climbing, kayaking, snorkeling, hiking, and biking!

What to bring

A lot of the companies that lead guided canyoning trips offer equipment rental as either a part of the cost or for a small, additional fee. It's always a good idea, however, to check beforehand what actually is included, and you can always bring some of the necessary equipment with you just in case.

1. What to wear

It goes without saying, you're going to get wet, so swimsuits, wetsuits, and a pair of trainers that are quick-dry (or that you don't mind getting soaked) are an absolute must. Safety equipment, such as helmets and lifejackets, are imperative, but it is highly unlikely you'll find yourself signing up to a guided tour without that being provided.

Photo from Splash Canyoning.

2. What to leave behind

You're going to be doing a lot of climbing, jumping, swimming, and all sorts of outdoor activities. Even if you're wearing gloves, removing all rings and jewelery from your wrists and hands is advisable, along with any piercings or necklaces. You don't want to lose anything valuable, or worse, get injured, because of your valuables!

3. Waterproof camera

If you want to document your trip, this is the opportune moment to invest in that GoPro you've been waiting to treat yourself to so you can capture some candid action shots while on your trip.

Photo from DC Rainmaker.

When planning your canyoning trip, keep your mind at ease by keeping your belongings safe and dry with some help from our guide for waterproof gear!