Extreme adventure travel: The Haute Route

By Fred Jéquier

Photo from Wilderness Travel.

When we think of the Alps, we normally think of skiing, snowboarding, and snow-covered mountains, but winter is not the only time to enjoy this stunning mountain range. Once the ski season has wound down for the year, it's time to get out the mountain bikes and boards or pull on your hiking boots.

The Haute Route is the perfect way to explore great swathes of the Alps. It gives any intrepid explorer the chance to combine both hiking and mountaineering without having to emulate career climbers and free soloists, like Alex Honnold, or ultra athletes, like Anton Krupicka—all while giving visitors to the region a comprehensive tour of this incredible mountain range.

Photo from Alex Honnold.

What is the Haute Route?

The Haute Route is a trekking expedition through the French and Swiss Alps that was first traversed in 1861 by climbers making their way to climb the Matterhorn. Over the years, the route has been perfected, and it is now a network of well-marked and signposted trails that lead travelers through valleys and mountain paths to mountain huts, small inns, and hotels in the idyllic villages and towns dotted along the way.

The expedition is a safe way to enjoy a mountaineering trip that doesn't require ropes, crampons, or specialized devices, but still remains challenging, due to the daily elevations and distances—all of which are achievable for anyone with a decent fitness level.

Photo from Nanuk Experience .

Starting in Chamonix, France, the route takes hikers over the swiss border, ending in Zermatt, just under a fortnight later. Taking part in this trip will not only give you the chance to explore some beautiful Alpine towns, but you will also get the chance to see Mont Blanc and the Matterhorn in all their glory.

The hike will take you from altitudes of 1,800 meters to almost 3,000 meters over the course of the expedition. You'll get to enjoy a front row seat to Mont Blanc and the Matterhorn; explore valleys, lakes, and glaciers; try some great local food; and learn about the region's history and culture.

Photo from Pinterest .

Who to go with

With a trip of this caliber, you're going to want to go with a guide who knows the route like the back of their hand and has a wide range of experience leading expeditions. There are various tour companies that offer great experiences and differing packages, depending on the wants and desires of the adventurer signing up to get involved in some Alpine trailblazing.

1. Wilderness Adventure

Wilderness Travel is one such company, with numerous veteran guides when it comes to leading an expedition. In addition to their Alpine adventure, Wilderness Travel has packages available all over the world, catering to all adventuring tastes and abilities.

Their Haute Route package, starting at $5,995, covers accommodation and all but two meals over a 12-day period. If this hike isn't challenging enough, the more intrepid explorer can also opt for their bespoke, Great Alpine Traverse, that will take you from Chamonix in France, through Switzerland, northern Italy, southern Germany, and finally to the historic city of Salzburg, Austria.

2. Alpenwild

Alpenwild specializes in trips and treks through the Alps. They also have a variety of packages available to their clients, each one offering differing difficulty levels and the option of either guided or self-guided treks.

The full, guided option will get you an all-inclusive experience. For $4,595, you'll get picked up at Geneva Airport, transported to Chamonix, and you'll have a guide leading the group for the full 11-day trip, followed by transportation from Zermatt to Geneva on the final day. All accommodations and meals, minus drinks and gratuities, are also included.

The self-guided option, starting from $2,895, also provides transportation to and from Geneva Airport, along with 13 nights in hostels, huts, and inns. Buffet breakfasts in each of the accommodations are available. Nine evening meals are also included, but you'll need to find a spot to eat in Chamonix, Verbier, and Zermatt, which will be easy enough. All three towns have a wide variety of restaurants and bars to choose from, so your only dilemma will be choosing between them all.

Alpenwild also provide you with all the information, maps, and documents you will need to complete the trip, including detailed route directions, basic trail maps, hotel contact information, train and bus schedules, and nearby emergency medical contacts.

What to bring

It goes with out saying, a trip like this requires a specific packing list. While you can leave your climbing ropes and crampons at home for this one, there are certain things that you should remember to put into your rucksack before catching your flight to Geneva. Here are just a few suggestions for your Haute Route adventure!

1. Hiking boots

It may seem like an obvious one, but there's never any harm in a small reminder. You're going to be hiking over some tough, albeit stunning, terrain, so a sturdy boot is vital. The better boots on the market offer support for your foot while also ensuring you don't roll your ankle if you step on loose rocks and turf. If you're buying new boots specifically for your trip, make sure you wear them in first to avoid blisters and discomfort on your trek.

Photo from Blacks.

2. Foot care products

When you reach your accommodation each night, the first thing you're going to want to do is unwind with a hot shower or a relaxing bath. Once you've washed away the day, make sure your feet are looked after well. Using moisturizing creams will help, but it doesn't stop there. Before you get going in the morning, make sure to use the same creams; mycota powder, which contains zinc undecylenoate and undecylenoic acid; and anti-rubbing tape in the areas you are susceptible to getting blisters in—all of which will ensure your feet don't go through undue trauma along the way.

Photo from Andrew Skurka.

3. A lightweight jacket

Yes, you are going in the summer, but it's still a mountain range! There's no denying there will be days when you're more comfortable with just a fleece or even a t-shirt, but when you're up to nearly 3,000 meters, staring the mountains in the face, you'll be grateful you packed a quality, lightweight jacket.

The Patagonia Nano Puff Jacket is a good option—light, yet warm, and water-resistant, it is easy to pack, and you'll definitely use it after your trip. Made from a 100% recycled polyester ripstop shell and lining fabric, the jacket zips to the neck, ensuring full body coverage. Although on the more expensive end of the spectrum, this will last you for years, making it a worthwhile investment.

Photo from Patagonia.

How to prepare

You've booked your trip, and you've bought your equipment, but you can't rest on your laurels now! While the Haute Route is doable for both rookies and mountaineering veterans, you'll still need to prepare your legs for what's about to come.

Photo from Pinterest .

1. Running

Going running several times a week is great preparation. You're not just strengthening your legs; you're also improving your cardio and lung function. You're not preparing for a marathon, so a five-kilometer run in the park two to three times a week should be enough.

2. Head to the gym

Going to the gym can be a bit of a drag, but some upper body work will help strengthen you up for carrying a backpack up mountain paths for a couple of weeks. While you're there, why not spend some time on a stair stepper, too? After all, a large portion of each day is going to be spent going up hill, so a few sessions will strengthen your joints before your adventure.

3. Hike before you hike

In the same way that the best way to prepare for a marathon is to run, the best way to prepare for a hiking holiday is to go hiking. You can pick some spots close to home, and once a week or so, head out and stomp up hills, through forests, and along footpaths for a few hours.

Again, as with running, you don't need to head out on a hobbit-sized quest, but getting your feet used to the idea of extended walking will only make it easier when you're halfway up a mountain path. It's also a great opportunity to break in those new hiking boots, as well!


Caught the hiking bug? Check out this blog for incredible places to hike and suggestions of places to stay on your next extraordinary adventure!

Our favorite dog-friendly trails in Banff

By Fred Jéquier

When heading out on a glamping adventure to somewhere like Banff in Alberta, Canada—with its trails galore, forests to explore, and lakes to navigate—many of us would relish the opportunity to share the experience with the four-legged members of our families. We've all been on vacations when, much to their indignation, we couldn't take our beloved canine pals, but by taking your dog to Banff, they'll stop hounding you to include them in your getaway plans.

Keep on reading to find out where you should stay and our favorite trails to hike in this beautiful corner of Canada!

Finding the perfect pad

Before you can set off on a hike with your dog, you first have to pick out that perfect, pet-friendly accommodation. With some wonderful options to choose from for your trip, you can grab those leashes, stock up on treats, and give your furry companion the vacation they deserve!

1. Dog house or dog palace?

This cabin with incredible mountain views will certainly give you paws for thought. It's not just pet-friendly, but it is perfect for a large family vacation, or even a group getaway. Set just outside of Calgary, Alberta, you and your dog can be hiking through Banff National Park together in under an hour.

2. A Golden opportunity

Another great location for you and your pet to relax after a busy day of exploring the forest and discovering new scents is Golden, British Columbia. Just over an hour's drive from Lake Louise, this fabulous cabin will leave even the smartest retriever thinking it's too far-fetched to be true! Glampers can kayak, and puppies can paddle while enjoying the comforts of this charming woodland cabin.

3. "Choose your own adventure" glamping

For a more rustic experience, glampers can opt for a cozy accommodation like this retro campervan, whose homebase is just south of Calgary, Alberta. Perfect for couples and hounds alike, the campervan set up by the hosts wherever guests would like, including any of the many campsites near Banff National Park. While the campervan must stay in one place, you and your canine companion most certainly don't have to and will be able to easily take advantage of the National Park's many trails together.

Pet-Friendly Trails

Now that you've found the ideal spot to stay with your four-legged friend, you can start to think about what you want to do in Banff National Park. You want to see as much as you can, while ensuring that your pet has an equally memorable time exploring the park. The perfect solution? There are plenty of different trail options available, varying in length, location, and difficulty.

1. Mistaya Canyon

This trail may be on the short side for the more seasoned explorer, but it's not to be sniffed at! Suitable for hikers of all skill levels and located about five kilometers south of Saskatchewan Crossing, the Mistaya Canyon Trail is a scenic hike. Just over a kilometer long, it features mesmerizing rock formations, rushing water, and several beautiful waterfalls.

2. Tunnel Mountain Trail

The Tunnel Mountain Trail is just under four kilometers long, starting on the edge of the town of Banff itself. There are some steep parts to walk up, but neither you nor your dog will find it too ruff, as there is time for you to catch your breath and bring a halt to any puffing and panting as the trail levels out in sections. When you get to the top, the climb will absolutely have been worth it. The views of Banff, and the surrounding mountains and forest are breathtaking!

3. Skoki Mountain Loop Trail

If you are hoping to unleash your inner hardcore trekker, this trail is the ideal choice. Nearly 40 kilometers in length, this looped trail features stunning views of Banff National Park and a lake that is perfect for enjoying on any particularly warm days. The Skoki Mountain Loop Trail is sure to be a great day out for both you and your right-hound man. Don't be surprised if any younger pups expect a helping paw to get to the finish line!

Park Rules

It's important to remember that those wagging tails lapping up their vacation time won't be the only members of the animal kingdom in the area. The National Park is home to a host of wildlife, and this means there are certain rules that dogs and their humans need to adhere to. Here are just a few important ones to remember, but glampers should also check out Alberta Animal Health Source for a more in-depth look at the rules.

1. Leashes

Dogs will need to stay on their leash while enjoying their day of hiking. With animals, such as black bears, cougars, and bison, living in the park, you'll want to make sure your pup stays close by. To give them a bit more freedom, the leash can be up to three meters long, so they can still have a sniff around.

2. Meeting the residents

If you do come across any of the local wildlife, such as elk or deer, give them a wide berth, especially during calving season. Sadly, these otherwise majestic creatures can't tell the difference between a friendly wagging tail saying "Hello!" and a wolf or coyote with less friendly intentions, so they won't be welcoming to any canine visitors.

3. Sunny days = hot cars

It's vital to remember not to leave your furry friend in the car, especially on a hot day. Besides, you wouldn't want to take your dog all that way just to leave them waiting for you while you enjoy the National Park, would you? Even if you're just popping into the shop on the way back to your accommodation, try to take your buddy along. They may enjoy having a look at a new town just as much as you.


For more information about Banff National Park, check out our in-depth travel guide, filled with information, tips, and ideas, for your glamping adventure in Alberta, Canada!

Staff Picks: Neil's Unique Accommodations for Extraordinary Adventures

By Neil Graham

Standing on the summit of Saddle Yoke in Scotland at 2,411 feet as an 11-year-old boy, I remember it felt like the biggest mountain in the world. The views were something from another planet and nothing like I’d ever seen before. It was -10 degrees Celsius, the wind was howling, and the heavy snowfall seemed relentless—something I should have hated—but I was there with my dad, looking out across this land of giants, thinking “This. Is. Awesome.”

Since that day, we’ve traveled the world navigating dangerous ridges and enduring extreme weather, while learning that getting up at 4 a.m. is not too early, that 17,600 feet is not too high, and a 30-kilo backpack is not too heavy. Climbing mountains, for me, was never about trudging up steep hillsides in the rain, searching for that sense of achievement, it was always about hanging out with my dad, witnessing landscapes that no photographer could ever do justice, and sharing challenging moments together...as well as a free pub meal and a pint on the way home.

At Glamping Hub, we understand that the bonds and memories you create in the great outdoors are special, so we’ve put together this collection of unique accommodations that are attached to extraordinary adventures.

Unique Up-Cycled Bus Accommodation Getaway near Reykjavik, Iceland

Look at our stunning collection of bus rentals!

This fascinating, up-cycled bus accommodation is the epitome of glamping, with it’s creative and innovative design showcasing the artistic personality of our host while offering our guests a truly unique experience at the foothills of Mount Esja. Only 10 minutes north of Iceland’s capital city, the mountain range dominates Reykjavic’s skyline and makes for a superb day of hiking along volcanic peaks in the snow and ice.

Stunning Modern Safari Tent Rentals with Private Patio near Leh, Jammu and Kashmir

Check out our other glamping accommodations in the Himalayas!

Guests staying at these enchanting safari tents in the region of Jammu and Kashmir will be able to wake up to the phenomenal sight of the soaring Himalayas, the clang of yak bells, and the fresh mountain air of northern India. There are miles of trekking trails nearby, as well as opportunities to kayak along the Indus and Zanskar Rivers, regarded as one of the most spectacular navigable gorges in the world.

Extraordinary Luxury Tree House near the Lule River in Swedish Lapland

Take a look at our amazing tree houses from around the world!

One of our most eye-catching accommodations, this incredible tree house can be found surrounded by the tall pines of Sweden’s Lapland, just 50 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle. Mountaineers looking to take on Sweden’s highest mountain, Kebnekaise, can reward themselves with a stay in the sublime wilderness of Harads and recuperate in style.

Luxury Camping Domes with Amazing Trail Access near Machu Picchu, Peru

Visiting Lima, Peru? Make it a vacation to remember and stay in of our unique rentals!

The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu is notorious for its astonishing archaeological sites and its green, jagged peaks. With the trail reaching an altitude of 13,828 feet at its highest elevation, guests will be hard-pressed to find such a rewarding adventure anywhere else in the world. The four-day trek is a magical experience for friends and families yearning to witness the beauty of the Andes, and these dome rentals in Cusco, Peru, will make the journey truly unforgettable.

Couples' Luxury Cabin with Unique Details near the Isle of Skye, Scotland

Planning a getaway in Scotland? Why not stay in an eco-pod in Orkney!

Dotted with medieval castles and historic fishing villages, Scotland’s northwest coast is a rugged landscape with a mythical aura that any explorer will fall in love with. This luxury cabin in the Highlands is just a short ferry ride to the Isle of Skye, which is home to Scotland’s most iconic rock, The Storr, as well as Sgùrr Deag and its Inaccessible Pinnacle, two treks that are engulfed by breathtaking natural beauty. Boasting a wood-fired hot tub and a deck with sensational views of the Sound of Sleat, guests are treated to the most stylish of base camps.

Luxury Canvas Tent Rentals for an Incredible Alaska Camping Experience on the Matanuska Glacier

See the Northern Lights at these glamping accommodations!

Spending nights out in the wilderness without access to television or the internet allows guests to reconnect with nature and with each other. It’s the perfect opportunity to share stories and ponder the deeper questions in life while enjoying the silence of the great outdoors. Guests at these glamping tents in Sutton, Alaska, will be able to try their hand at ice climbing on the nearby Matanuska Glacier and hike along the renowned Lion’s Head Trail past lakes, ice falls, and the peaks of the snow-capped Talkeetna Mountains. At certain times of the year, guests may be lucky enough to catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights, which makes for a magical end to the day.


Looking for more hiking adventures? Have a look at our best hiking vacations in California for 2018!

Cape Town's Big Five Hiking Trails

By Jackie Dreyer

Please note: This piece was guest written by Tatum-Lee Louw, the Brand Content Manager of the Drive South Africa car rental company.

Cape Town is a lush evergreen province situated in the Western Province of South Africa. It is well-known as the Mother City and is the home of one of the Seven Wonders of the World, Table Mountain. The city is absolutely beautiful, and it’s popular hiking trails offer travelers an unforgettable experience along with picturesque views to last a lifetime.

Here are five of Cape Town’s best hiking trails:

Newlands Forest

If you ever want to go on a gratifying hike along the slopes of Table Mountain, Newlands Forest is your ideal destination. This strategically-located jungle in Cape Town is not only popular for walking and jogging, but it also attracts many picnickers, nature lovers, and leisure strollers. An exciting characteristic of the hiking trail is its wooden boardwalks, which are well-maintained along with the raised picnic expanse in the woods.

Hikers can choose many ways to get through the contour path that opens up pathways to the summit of the mountain. Newlands is located in the Southern Suburbs, so if it’s your first time in Cape Town, you might opt for renting a car instead of public transport.

Lion’s Head

Lion’s Head is a fun destination that coined its name from its characteristic shaped slope as seen along Table Mountain, which resembles the king of the jungle overlooking the picturesque Atlantic Ocean shoreline on one side, as well as Table Bay and Cape Town on the other. The hike accommodates adults, children, and pets, and even though you might find the walk steep at specific parts of the trail, the most memorable thing about hiking here is the breathtaking view of Cape Town.

Serious hikers frequently visit Lion's Head because of the series of ladders and chains fixed along the path to make the walk effortless at specific rock faces with steep sections. The local guides usually advise those hiking with young children to take an alternative route to avoid the scary chain section.

Constantia Nek to Kirstenbosch

Taking an exploratory hike between Constantia Nek and Kirstenbosch is a pleasantly-energetic walk that leaves guests satisfied, even during winter. The location is in Constantia, Cape Town, whereby the six-kilometer trail stretches within the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens and includes a stopover at the Kirstenbosch Tea Room, where you can have a delightful breakfast. Those who wish to spend more time enjoying the adventure can book for accommodation in Constantia.

This hiking trail begins from the entrance of the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens and ends at the scenic summits of Constantia Nek. Although the hiking trail is easily accessible, you will need a vehicle to transport you from the two different locations. Most outdoor enthusiasts contact the car rentals at Cape Town International Airport for advice on an affordable transportation option.

Jonkershoek Nature Reserve

The Nature Reserve is strategically located in the southwestern Cape, neighboring Stellenbosch and covering the magnificent Jonkershoek Mountains, as well as vivid sections of the Jonkershoek gorge. The circular hiking trail around this destination is approximately 10 kilometers in circumference and takes hikers way down to the valley floor.

The circular drive has four hiking trails with specific lengths and varied difficulty, which includes the approximately 5.3-kilometer Sosyskloof route, the 18-kilometer Swartboskloof Route, the 17-kilometer Panorama Circuit, and the 6.4-kilometer Eerste & Tweede Waterval route.

Kalk Bay Mountains

This mountainside destination is an ideal place that provides both casual and serious hikers with a variety of trails to explore. Kalk Bay trails cover the scenic coastal communities that over the years have enjoyed the stunning sights of the Kalk Bay Harbour, as well as the coinciding False Bay area. Just above Kalk Bay is Boyes Drive, which is one of the access points for this splendid destination, with Silvermine East being another access point that hikers can alternatively use.

Boomslang Cave is found within the Kalk Bay area, and hikers can practice carving here, making this destination a thrilling hiking spot for visitors. The cave can be easily accessed via the tunnels that cleverly cut through the mountain, which can help children learn in the course of the adventure in the woods. The Kalk Bay hiking trail combines two outstanding expanses of indigenous forests and ends up at the summit of the mountains.

There are plenty of other amazing picturesque views to explore in and around Cape Town. If you’re planning your summer holiday, check out some more of the Western Cape’s finest destinations on Glamping Hub!


Tatum-Lee Louw is currently the Brand Content Manager of the Drive South Africa car rental company. She completed her BA degree at the University of the Western Cape and is currentlly pursuing her Honors degree in Applied Linguistics. She has a keen interest in Digital Marketing, Linguistics, and Publishing.

Best Places to Hike in Scotland

By Joe Endaya

A man going on a hike in Scotland.

We believe that the perfect detox for escaping that daily 9-to-5 grind is fresh air, exercise, the pure liberating feeling of freedom, and an adventure away from it all—even if it's just for a weekend. Shrouded in mist and mystery, the eclectic landscape of Scotland is the perfect destination for anyone looking for their next great experience. With miles upon miles of challenging trails for even the most seasoned of adventure junkies and breathtaking views that are sure to scratch that wanderlust itch, here is some of our favorite hiking spots in Scotland where you can lose yourself among the splendor of nature.

**1. For The Best Views:** The Magical Great Glen Way

A glamping cottage with a great view in Scotland.

The Great Glen Way stretches from coast-to-coast across the sprawling Scottish countryside. Sweeping hills to sprawling lochs, highlands to lowlands, and everything in between, this spectacular trail truly encompasses and encapsulates the diversity of Scotland's topographical landscape.

As you follow the prevailing winds toward the east, you'll feel as if you were dropped into a fairytale, wandering through marvelous castles and esoteric ruins of medieval strongholds from eons long gone. The trail even crosses the iconic Loch Ness, where you might catch a glimpse of the ever-elusive and legendary Loch Ness Monster. For an experience that is so quintessentially Scotland, this trail might just be the perfect fit!

**2. For Adventure Junkies:** A Third of the National Three Peaks Challenge

A hiker on a trail in Fort William, Scotland.

The illustrious National Three Peaks Challenge of the U.K. is perfect for outdoor buffs and thrill seekers alike. The challenge consists of three mountain climbs across the U.K., with the highest–and most challenging!–being the formidable Ben Nevis in Scotland, also known as the highest peak in the country. At an elevation of 4,409 feet, good ol' Ben Nevis poses a challenge for even the most seasoned of mountaineers.

If you're looking for an adventure like no other, there's no better way to fuel your adrenaline needs than climbing up to the pinnacle of Ben Nevis and reveling in the breathtaking views of the Scottish countryside's sheer beauty as your reward. With the vast mountainscape below and the pristine cerulean skies above, the views from the top promise to be a sight to behold.

**3. For Couples:** Finding Love at the Lover's Stone

A view of Lover's Stone in Scotland.

With France, Spain, and Italy in the mix, Scotland isn't always everyone's go-to spot for an intimate couples getaway, but Latin Europe sure doesn't have a monopoly on romance. With dramatic cliffside bluffs, enigmatic woodlands, and fairytale-esque castles abound, Scotland is just a good a place as any for couples looking to lose themselves in a magical land.

The remote coastal St. Kilda is the perfect spot for a picturesque, intimate hike with your other half, whether you're celebrating your anniversary or newlyweds who can't tell the difference between a honeymoon and an adventure. Perhaps the most romantic spot of all is the Lover's Stone, with legends foretold of prospective grooms proving their dedication to their loved one by standing on one foot over the jutting rock atop the precarious cliffside.

**4. For Those with a Furry Friend:** Paws Up at Loch Lomond

A dog posing mid-stream in a river in Scotland.

If there’s one thing dogs love, it’s getting in touch with the wilderness. Any pup, pug, or poodle would feel right at home at nature, it’s in their blood. As pet owners ourselves, we know how important it is to let the pooch roam and frolic in the great outdoors. With a number of dog-friendly trails in Scotland, there's no excuse not to bring Fido on your next adventure.

Loch Lomond is just one of the many places in Scotland that welcomes hikers with both two feet and four. From splashing on the loch to running wild and free across vast, boulder-strewn fields, your furry friend can explore its inner wild side in the very same wilderness their very ancestors used to roam.

**5. For Just About Anyone:** Flying High in the Highlands

Lastly, we have the sprawling Scottish Highlands—the absolute perfect haven for adventure enthusiasts, thrill seekers, and nature lovers alike. With a meandering mountainscape stretching as far as the eye can see, you'll be able to find a number of mountain ranges, craggy pinnacles, sweeping valleys, plateaus, ridges, chasms, and other otherworldly geological wonders just waiting to be explored.

Some of the most dramatic trails can be found in the Highlands, as well as some of the most surreal sights that you're bound to come across. The area abounds with medieval ruins and other remnants of the past. From a full-on hiking expedition to a quiet afternoon amble, the Highlands might be the perfect backdrop for your next adventure.


That isn't all. For more potential adventure ideas in Scotland, check out our curated collection of Scotland's top glamping sites here!

The Unmissable Trails You Should Hike in Colorado

By Hayley Donigan

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Here at Glamping Hub, we’re enthusiasts of all things nature—sleeping in nature, eating in nature, and, most importantly, exploring right in the heart of nature. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned hiker, we’re sure you know that one of the best ways to immerse yourself in wilderness is to get out on the trails and see what wonderful surprises are in store for you.

What's more? Hiking is a natural stress reliever. The major positive side of hiking is that it gives you many options to choose from regarding the location. Picking a spot which is serene and calm will help you to lift up your spirits and stay away from the daily stress.

Every state in the U.S. has beautiful hiking spots, and Colorado is no exception. There are tons of unparalleled hiking spots in this mountain state, whether it’s a trail through the Rockies or a day hike near Boulder. Some of these hikes are simply unmissable, so we’ve written about three of the best trails you should hike in Colorado to help you get your adventure started.

Columbine Trail —Three Miles Long—Moderate Difficulty

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Fantastic for those who want to soak in the native flora and fauna of Colorado in a simple day hike, the Columbine Trail in Colorado Springs can be accessed from three trailheads (allowing you to choose the length and difficulty of your hike). It meanders through beautiful Cheyenne Canyon and has a terrific end at Helen Hunt Falls. Along the way, you will see Mays Peak, Mount Buckhorn, Mount Cutler, and Muscoco Mountain, and there are babbling streams and plenty of wildlife to enjoy as you trek.

Barr Trail —13 Miles Long—Difficult

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If you want to challenge yourself a little bit more, then graduate onto the Barr Trail, which winds through Pike National Forest. Its high elevation increases its difficulty, but the reward is great—the climb ends at Pikes Peak summit. Interestingly, Barr Trail was originally created in the 1800s by a prospector, and it later became a burro trail. Now, it is one of the most popular hiking trails in Colorado.

Colorado Trail —486 Miles Long—Difficult

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Traversing the Colorado Trail is one of the greatest feats that any Colorado resident can complete. Stretching from near Denver to Durango, it winds through one of the most mountainous regions in the state. In fact, it crosses through six National Forests, eight mountain ranges, several mining towns, and even ancient Native American trails. The challenge will be rewarded because hikers of this trail will undoubtedly experience some of the most stunning scenery in Colorado.


You will never regret experiencing the thrill of completing one of these great Colorado hiking trails, and you’ll be equally thrilled to spend your nights in nature too. Ranging from mountain cabins to authentic tipis, our Colorado weekend getaways are a wonderful addition to any hike in this mountain state. Click here to explore our top mountain getaways.